The Legislative Branch

The Legislative Branch of the United States is bicameral system, with both a House of Representatives and a Senate. It is responsible for drafting and presenting laws for passage into law. They are also responsible for the levy and collection of taxes, the mintage of currency, regulation of its value, punishment for its counterfeiting, the establishment of infrastructure such as roads and postal offices, the issue of patents, the creation of federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court, combat felonies, declare war, raise and support armies, the maintaining of a navy, the arming and discipline of a militia, the exercise of executive legislation in the District of Columbia, and to make laws necessary to property execute powers. Disputes that arise within the Legislative branch occur, but are settled in finality in the Supreme court.

The House of Representatives consists of 435 members who each represent a congressional district. This means that states with a higher population have more representatives in the senate. Each representative serves their district for a two-year term, and there is no limit to how many times a representative can run for office. In order to run for representative, a person must be at least 25 years old, live in their state of representation, and be a citizen of the U.S. for at least 7 years. In addition to the voting members, there are 6 non-voting members. These are delegates from the District of Columbia, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. There is one Resident commissioner representing Puerto Rico. Their powers differ from the Senate in that legislative bills that raise revenue must start in the House. Both the Senate and House of Representatives must pass on legislation before it becomes a law that can be signed or vetoed by the president. If vetoed, The Senate and The House of Representatives can force the bill into law with a vote of a two-thirds majority.

The Senate is made up of two senators from each state, which allows less populated states to see equal representation to larger states. Each senator serves 6-year terms. Their powers differ from the House of Representatives in that many senators serve as advisors to president-appointed officials. Both the Senate and House of Representatives must pass on legislation before it becomes a law that can be signed or vetoed by the president. If vetoed, The Senate and The House of Representatives can force the bill into law with a vote of a two-thirds majority. In order to run for Senate, a candidate must be at least 30 years old and hold residency in their state for a certain number of years. Depending on which state the senator is from, this time can change.